GRPL Teens

A library blog for teens

546 notes

nprbooks:

I kind of want to take this challenge:

Last year, Australian writer Patrick Lenton compiled a massive list of every single book that was referenced in the Gilmore Girls series, and set out to read each one in an attempt to complete what’s known as the “Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge.” Lenton’s currently on book number 18 — Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress — and estimates if he reads one book every two weeks, it’ll take him two more years to complete the challenge.
-via Buzzfeed

-Nicole

nprbooks:

I kind of want to take this challenge:

Last year, Australian writer Patrick Lenton compiled a massive list of every single book that was referenced in the Gilmore Girls series, and set out to read each one in an attempt to complete what’s known as the “Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge.” Lenton’s currently on book number 18 — Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress — and estimates if he reads one book every two weeks, it’ll take him two more years to complete the challenge.

-via Buzzfeed

-Nicole

(via rcplteens)

52 notes

Mediocrity in YA - a rant about how frustrated I am with the YA genre right now

yaflash:

jreadsya:

A week ago I read Uninvited by Sophie Jordan and wrote a review of it on Goodreads, but since it was pretty harsh, I didn’t want to post it here. Buuuut I’m gonna post it. I don’t feel like Uninvited is necessarily a bad book, but it has been another in a long line of YA novels that are all…

I do have thoughts!

First, I share the frustration a lot of the time. I do. I often read a shiny new book and think “well, that was okay” rather than “OMG WHEN IS THE NEXT ONE NEED IT NOW” or “MY HEART AND BRAIN ARE SHATTERED.” And I want that from my fiction. I crave it.

That said, I’m in kind of a weird, in-betweener position, because I am both a critical reader of YA and someone who writes it (as well as MG). Not only do I write it, but I’ve been through the querying and getting agented and going on submission stage, although I haven’t sold yet. So I have some (albeit not all) insight into the other side of the coin: publishing.

There are a lot of factors at play, but the biggest one is that publishing is always a business (always, always a business… sigh). Several friends and I have been through the submission wringer over the last few years, and we write good novels. I’m not being arrogant, here — our work is good. Professionals tell us it’s good. It’s fresh, it’s different, it’s literary and genre-blending and weird. Unfortunately, sometimes that’s its downfall — weird books don’t always have a place in The Market. It’s murder trying to sell a spec YA novel right now, which just goes to show that they AREN’T taking just anything. Not anymore.

Anyway, that was a bit of a sidetrack, but ultimately it was to make the point that people are writing good books, but good books aren’t always good enough anymore. Over the last several years, YA was SUPER DUPER overbought because it was exploding everywhere. So we saw (and are still seeing) an influx of novels that circle around similar “marketable” genres and tropes. But that’s changing. I was on submission in 2012-2013, and we could already see that they were tightening up standards a lot on what got through the doors. However, we’re not going to see these supposedly better, more filtered books for another 2-3 years. We’re starting to see a few, here and there, and the cover trends are showing an intentional shift away from frilly dresses and dude’s abs. Hopefully the content follows suit.

We also have to remember that we keep seeing the same tropes because 1) they’re safe, and debut authors often have to be safe until they can prove they’re salable, and 2) these books are intended for younger readers who aren’t necessarily super familiar with these tropes yet. We can’t forget that YA is a category for young people (and I mean 12-17 young) and that something we (adults) have read a million times may still be new to them. YA is going to work in waves, because teenagers get older, but the books are still for the people just becoming teenagers.

I definitely feel it’s troubling that the “HARK! A HOT GUY!” trope is so heavy-handed in books about young women, and I think it’s important to remain critical of YA and hold it to a high standard, because I think it deserves that. On the other hand, every book can’t be The Greatest Book. Some books are just going to be okay, and that’s fine. It happens in every section of the bookstore. Some literary works are just okay, some SFF is just okay, some detective fiction is just okay, etc. I’m okay with some YA being just okay.

Part of why I’m so passionate about this genre is because it’s for young people, and I want them to have great stories. I’m less worried about impressing university students or adults than I am about making a teenager feel powerful. That doesn’t mean I’m not here for quality, because I 100% am, but my primary goal is whether the target audience feels something after they read, and whether that feeling is good and empowering. Sometimes a story that we think is “just okay” can change a kid’s life. I mean I watch people eyerolling about how twee and derivative A Wrinkle In Time is, but that book was the literal foundation of my love of spec fiction, you know?

I walk the line, I guess. *strums guitar* I crave and demand quality YA fiction, and I am completely in favor of dismantling shitty tropes and being better, but I can also be okay with “okay” if it’s connecting with someone in a positive way.

I am so verbose, yeesh. But these are my thoughts!

Filed under ya books interesting

1,684 notes

The legend goes, the Crusaders summoned an angel, the Angel Raziel. Raziel poured his blood into a cup and those who drank from it became half angel, half human. Shadowhunters. As did their children and their’s children’s children. Beings of immense power, strong enough to restore balance and protect the world in a war against evil. A war that can never be won, but must always be fought. Demons don’t die easily. Whereas we… we remained all too mortal.

(Source: viserione, via clockworkpain)

1,174 notes

yareviewnetwork:

epicreads:

ROMANTIC YA FOR THE WIN! [Source]
The Distance Between Us by Kasie West
Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller
How to Love by Katie Cotugno
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
Rock and A Hard Place by Angie Stanton
My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Crash by Nicole Williams
Open Road Summer by Emery Lord
If I Stay by Gayle Forman 
The Sky is Everywhere by Jandi Nelson
Perfect Chemistry by Simone Elkeles
The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han
Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Saenz
Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta
Every Day by David Levithan
The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
The Sea of Tranquility by Katja Millay
The Trouble with Flirting by Claire LaZebnik
Sloppy Firsts by Megan McCafferty 
If We Kiss by Rachel Vail
Love and Leftovers by Sarah Tregay
The Promise of Amazing by Robin Constantine
The Book of Broken Hearts by Sarah Ockler
How Zoe Made Her Dreams (Mostly) Come True by Sarah Strohmeyer
Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) by Sarah Mlynowski
Street Love by Walter Dean Myers
Nobody But Us by Kristin Halbrook
If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan
Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

Some of my favorite romantic YA include, but are not limited to: 
How to Say Goodbye in Robot
This Lullaby 
The DUFF
Boy Proof
Candy
Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist
Flipped
What are some of your favorites? 
~Lourdes 

yareviewnetwork:

epicreads:

ROMANTIC YA FOR THE WIN! [Source]

The Distance Between Us by Kasie West

Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller

How to Love by Katie Cotugno

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Rock and A Hard Place by Angie Stanton

My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick

Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver

Crash by Nicole Williams

Open Road Summer by Emery Lord

If I Stay by Gayle Forman 

The Sky is Everywhere by Jandi Nelson

Perfect Chemistry by Simone Elkeles

The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han

Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Saenz

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

Every Day by David Levithan

The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith

The Sea of Tranquility by Katja Millay

The Trouble with Flirting by Claire LaZebnik

Sloppy Firsts by Megan McCafferty 

If We Kiss by Rachel Vail

Love and Leftovers by Sarah Tregay

The Promise of Amazing by Robin Constantine

The Book of Broken Hearts by Sarah Ockler

How Zoe Made Her Dreams (Mostly) Come True by Sarah Strohmeyer

Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) by Sarah Mlynowski

Street Love by Walter Dean Myers

Nobody But Us by Kristin Halbrook

If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

Some of my favorite romantic YA include, but are not limited to: 

How to Say Goodbye in Robot

This Lullaby 

The DUFF

Boy Proof

Candy

Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist

Flipped

What are some of your favorites? 

~Lourdes 

(Source: bit.ly)

Filed under ya books